Thursday, February 23, 2012

Quote of the Day


"As for the hype, if the Knicks had Ricky Rubio, the brilliant 20-year-old Spanish point guard for Minnesota, Spike Lee would be sitting at courtside in a bullfighter costume, and people would be writing dopey articles about the link between flamenco rhythms and basketball. It’s just New York being New York."

-- Gene Lyons, dissecting the true meaning of "Linsanity" in Salon

This pretty much nails it. While everyone else is losing their freaking minds trying to figure out why Jeremy Lin is the biggest phenomenon since Justin Bieber, the reality is that New York City's just happy to have a winning basketball team again and, in true NYC fashion, it's making sure the whole world knows it and gets on board.

If Lin had moved from the Warriors to the Rockets to the OKC Thunder, a lot less people would give a crap.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

A native New Yorker and proud of it. That is the way we roll and possibly the reason why the entire middle of this country despises us so much, yet wishes that they were part of it all, and ultimately come here at one point in their lives to see what it is all about. I, love it...

Chez said...

And you wonder why people think New Yorkers are a bunch of arrogant assholes.

Actually, I did live there for several years and love the city to death. But the we're-better-than-everyone-else thing gets old in pretty short order. If you want to piss yourself off, and at least try to begin to understand how everyone else in the country feels about you, listen to Patton Oswalt's bit about New York City and why he doesn't live there.

Anonymous said...

Chez,

I completely understand the disdain. About 4 years ago I spent the better part of 2 years traveling around the country trying to get a feel for what the "real" America was about. There are indeed plenty of wonderful people all over America, but, there were also a very large amount of intolerant ass holes who immediately had a preconceived notion of my New York liberal Jew-ish-ness as soon as I opened my mouth.

You see, I came to understand that they were as bigoted towards me as I "had" been towards them. What I was left with was a deeper understanding of who I was, because of where I came from, and how I had been so opened to try and understand them, but did not always feel that in return.

I am not sorry that I made this journey and I made some wonderful friends along the way, but at 56 I now make no apologies for being who I am and loving where I came from because it made me who I ultimately am...

Just to add... I think very highly of your writing and really don't post here too much but just wanted you to know that I am here every day reading.

Chez said...

First of all, thanks very much for the kind words.

I do get what you're saying. I've spent most of my life on the coasts, in Miami, New York or L.A. I've traveled quite a bit in between -- usually by car so that I could get a feel for what America was really like. Yeah, an unbelievable amount of beauty and some truly spectacular people -- but certainly a lot of ignorant fucks as well. For the record, that can be said about almost anyplace -- including NYC. But I get your point about loving where you're from and how it shapes you. I think my constant movement shaped me in positive and negative ways. I'm now finally finding some contentment -- and it's really, really nice.

Anonymous said...

If you are Asian, Jeremy Lin is something else entirely.

It might be difficult for a non-Asian to fully comprehend, but Jeremy Lin has been something Asian Americans have been waiting *decades* for and they're not about to let it go and act hipster about him. He's making Asians cooler simply by existing and playing well.

Chez said...

God, you've cornered the market on math and child prodigies. Do you really have to have the NBA too?