Monday, June 27, 2011

Quote of the Day


"John Wayne was from Waterloo, Iowa. That’s the kind of spirit that I have, too."

-- Michele Bachmann

At first glance, there's nothing wrong with this statement aside from its being the kind of ridiculously pedestrian pandering we've all come to expect from Republican candidates in general and tea partiers in particular. But then you realize that this is Michele Bachmann -- and therefore it comes as no surprise that John Wayne the legendary actor and conservative icon wasn't, in fact, from Waterloo, Iowa but the notorious serial killer John Wayne Gacy was.

Just remember, though -- ignore this sort of thing and trust the political media when they drool all over themselves to tell you that Bachmann is someone who deserves to be taken seriously.

18 comments:

Dona said...

Wasn't he born in Chicago??? (Gacy)

Nick said...

Bigot.

There are support groups for John Wayne Gacy haters.

John Foley said...

I knew where this story was going even before I got to the punchline. She's just that predictable.

Eric said...

John Wayne Gacy was a mentally-ill clown who loved the kids. Why is everyone thinking Michelle Bachmann misspoke when she said she had his spirit?

kanye said...

This is a twofer...wrong in both fact and inference.

Anonymous said...

John Wayne was born in Winterset, Iowa, about 160 miles from Waterloo. Funny, Michelle!

Anonymous said...

How's that old saying go, "Sometimes the headlines just write themselves"?

Benoit from Ottawa said...

Wow. I mean, just wow.

Ref said...

Bachmann campaign attack on the Librul Media in three...two...

Chez said...

Gacy spent the early part of his life in Waterloo, Dona. Far as I know, he was actually born in Chicago. It's really a silly slip-up and one probably not worthy of all the attention it'll get for 24 hours, considering that actor Wayne was born not far away -- but it's still really entertaining. It'd be easy to say that Bachmann was inheriting the mantle of Sarah Palin if she hadn't already, quite a while back.

Anonymous said...

Someone really needs to photoshop her into Gacy clown-face.

kanye said...

Not to belabor the point, but I was 13 years-old, living in Chicago when the Gacy story broke. The story was 24/7 here for months, at a time when there was no cable television in Chicago; our own local version of the O.J. trial. We were hammered with every little detail about this man and his life. It was pretty much indelibly imprinted onto our collective cortices.

He lived in Waterloo as a married adult for three-odd years; not even long enough to be considered "from there".

That is what it is; people make mistakes. This is the part bothered me:

At first glance, there's nothing wrong with this statement aside from its being the kind of ridiculously pedestrian pandering we've all come to expect from Republican candidates in general and tea partiers in particular.

This kind of behavior isn't reserved for just Republicans or tea-partiers. We need only look back to the last presidential election to see that.

Barack Obama never let a single opportunity pass without telling the public about his strong Midwestern morals and values, instilled in him by a family with deep Kansan roots. As if the history of the state of Kansas is some shining beacon of tolerance and understanding; as if "Bloody Kansas" was something to be proud of.

And when people pointed out that he'd never actually been to Kansas, the campaign was quick to correct. He'd been there on several occasions they told us. Yeah, sitting on the tarmac while his campaign jet was being refueled.

This is the kind of Salesmanship:101 bullshit we're regularly bombarded with from all sides: Establish a familiar rapport with the customer by exploiting or trading on any shared experience or bit of mutual interest that you happen to share with the customer.

And if you can't find any common ground, make something up.

Chez said...

It's a fair statement that politics in general is little more than shameless pandering. What irks me then is that the political right tends to invoke and co-opt the most grandiose, least humble of traditional American iconography and it calls itself the only viewpoint qualified to do so. The natural inheritor of that particular mantle.

Chez said...

How the hell did I manage to use the "inheriting the mantle" turn of a phrase twice in the same thread? My brain is really fried right now.

Benoit from Ottawa said...

Chez, 'sokay. Inherit as many mantles as you want.


Kanye: good post, and well-written.*


*So much so it pressured me to use the hyphen.

Stephen said...

Gene Kelly was brilliant in Inherit the Mantle. Really showed off his acting chops instead of just dancing.

What was that? Oh..nevermind...

kanye said...

Let’s be honest, Benoit, neither one of us has seen a hyphen in a very long time.

Oh, wait, I’m thinking about something else.

Liquid said...

What were George Carlin's words of wisdom?

"Even John Wayne Gacy loved his children."